NEA Baptist Clinic

Daily Bread

  • Think healthy eating instead of going on a diet.
  • Control your weight and help control your blood cholesterol by exercising and eating a low-fat diet.
  • Learn how to work a sweet food into your meal plan occasionally, rather than as an extra.
  • Fat has more than twice as many calories as carbohydrate or protein. For weight management, eat foods with less fat.
  • Alcohol has 7 calories per gram. This is almost twice the calories of carbohydrate of protein.
  • A moderate serving size of meat is 3 ounces after cooking or about the size of the palm of a woman’s hand or a deck of cards.
  • Vanilla adds perceived sweetness, making foods taste sweeter than they really are.
  • Whole wheat flour adds fiber, vitamins, iron, and protein; try replacing half the flour in a recipe with whole wheat flour.
  • Substituting margarine for butter will lower the saturated fat and cholesterol, but remember the calories remain the same.
  • By choosing the sweetest varieties of fruits and the ripest available, you can cut back on the amount of sugar needed in fruit desserts.
  • You’ll save calories when substituting one ounce of solid chocolate with three tablespoons of cocoa powder.
  • A healthy weight and the weight that is right for you depends upon many factors, including your sex, height, age and heredity.
  • Eat regular meals. Skipping meals can result in overeating later in the day. If you become too hungry, it will be easier to forget about good nutrition.
  • Remember good nutrition when planning snacks. Consider the calories and nutrients they contain.
  • Balance the high-fat ones, such as candy bars, nuts and chips with the lower-fat ones,such as pretzels, fruits and raw vegetables.
  • You don’t have to be a member of the clean plate club. Learn to quit eating when you’re satisfied, not just when all of the food is gone.
  • Scientific studies, which included people of all ages, have not found aspartame to cause a true allergic reaction.
  • There are no known health advantages in using sea salt rather than table salt. The sodium content is similar.
  • If you’re caffeine-sensitive, remember that not all types of soft drinks come caffeine-free. Most fruit-flavored soft drinks do not have caffeine.
  • A beverage may be sweetened with corn syrup or high-fructose corn syrup, but this does not mean it has any less calories than if sweetened with sucrose or table sugar.
  • When dining out and waiting for your food to arrive, make good use of your time: read a book, write a note, or bring along work from the office.
  • Use less fat than recipe calls for (start with 1/3 less, then go down from there).
  • Use applesauce or other fruit purees for all or part of the oil in cake mixes or quick breads.
  • Use skim milk instead of 2% or whole in recipes.
  • Use evaporated skim milk in place of whole milk, or for sauces that call for cream.
  • Use butter substitutes like Butter Buds, or Molly McButter.
  • Increase spices to compensate for less fat.
  • Use marinades to make leaner meats more tender.
  • Cut back on amount of nuts called for in recipes, or substitute grape nuts, raisins or toasted nuts (flavor is greater, so you can use less).
  • Use 2 egg whites or 1/4 cup egg substitute for each whole egg in a recipe.
  • Saute foods in broth or wine, or use less oil in a non-stick pan.
  • Use yogurt cheese in place of sour cream in recipes and dips.
  • Substitute 1/2 cup non-fat yogurt for the 1 egg + 3 Tbsp. oil called for in most cake mixes.
  • Substitute reduced-fat cream soup or make your own substitute instead of regular cream soup in casseroles.
  • Use reduced-fat cheese, or use 1/3 - 1/2 less regular cheese (but buy sharp flavored - less will taste like more if the flavor is stronger).
  • Instead of a big piece of meat, a few vegetables and a small serving of grains, take up 3/4 of the plate with grains and vegetables, and only 1/4 with meat.
  • For spaghetti sauce in jars or cans, look for those with under 3 grams fat per serving.
  • Grab a piece of fruit or two as a snack.
  • Pack raw vegetables for lunch - broccoli, carrots, cauliflower, celery, peppers.
  • Add vegetables to chili, stir-fried dishes, or stews.
  • Pick your favorite sweets and include them in your meal plan once or twice a week at most.
  • Split a dessert to satisfy your sweet tooth while lowering the sugar, fat, and calories.
  • Start the day with cold (dry) cereal with nonfat/skim milk or a bagel with one teaspoon of jelly/jam.
  • Put starch center stage - pasta with tomato sauce, baked potato with chili, rice and stir-fried beef and vegetables.
  • Add cooked black beans, corn, or garbanzo beans (chickpeas) to salads or casseroles.
  • Use low-fat or fat-free cream cheese, salad dressing, mayonnaise, or sour cream.
  • Just use less - butter and margarine, mayonnaise, cream cheese, salad dressing, or oil.
  • Use fat-free toppers - jam/jelly, mustard, salsa, fat-free yogurt, or sauces.
  • Saute with flavored vinegars or lemon/lime juice.
  • When using oil, choose olive, canola, soybean, corn, sunflower, or safflower.
  • Eat more skinless poultry and seafood prepared by grilling, broiling, or poaching.
  • Use low-fat dairy products - nonfat/skim milk, low-fat cheeses, low-fat yogurt, and low-fat dairy desserts.
  • Moderate your intake of foods that use hydrogenated fat as an ingredient.
  • At the deli, choose sandwiches with lean roast beef, turkey, or ham; vegetables; mustard rather than mayonnaise.
  • Order pizza with vegetable topping or Canadian bacon.
  • Take the skin off the chicken whether fried or rotisserie cooked.
  • For a Mexican meal, choose fajitas, soft tacos, or bean or chicken burritos.
  • At holiday time, splurge only on foods you really feel are special.
  • Make a list of things to do to offset a food craving.
  • Drink a warm cup of tea before going to a party - for a feeling of fullness.
  • Make a point to eat at least 3-5 servings of fruits and vegetables daily.
  • When you have an office lunch at a fancy restaurant, plan on bean soup for dinner, not grilled cheese sandwiches.
  • Ask yourself if it's worth it before you put it into your mouth.
  • If you indulge in your friend's famous home-baked treat, say no to the store-bought cookies.
  • Eat slim at most meals. Expect to indulge at some meals.
  • Don't go to a party starved.
  • If you've got a choice between baking two favorite cookies, choose the one that has less fat.
  • Read your recipes (before shopping) and see where you can cut fat DOWN not out!
  • Regular mayo and sour cream can be left out of dips the low-fat and non-fat yogurt will blend fine with all the other ingredients and flavors.
  • Replace half the fat in stuffing with chicken broth.
  • Substitute simple crusty rolls for fat-filled biscuits.
  • Trim all visible fat off meats. Remove skin from chicken. Cook meats on a rack so the fat can drip off the meat and into a pan.
  • Avoid fried foods or have them only occasionally. Boil, bake, steam or poach foods.
  • Buy water-packed instead of oil-packed tuna.
  • Avoid cream or creamers in coffee and tea. Use milk, preferably skim.
  • Avoid gravies. Most gravy is made with meat fat. Instead, season food with herbs and spices, tomato, lemon or lime juice.
  • Eat broth-type soups instead of cream soups.
  • Cut down or eliminate high-fat spreads on breads and rolls. Watch out for butter, margarine, or mayonnaise, all of which are high in fat.
  • Avoid or limit high-fat desserts. High-fat desserts include pies, ice cream, chocolate candies, and most cakes.
  • Use non-stick skillets, if possible. Little or no fat is required with these.
  • Ground meat can be browned without adding extra fat. Start cooking over medium heat until the meat releases some fat. Pour off the excess fat.
  • Use non-fat, plain yogurt instead of sour cream in cakes and breads.
  • Use marinades of lemon juice, flavored vinegars or fruit juices mixed with herbs when grilling or broiling and to tenderize leaner cuts of meat.
  • Create sauces by adding stock or broth to pan juices and thicken by boiling rapidly for a few minutes. Season with herbs.
  • Rely on your microwave to reheat leftovers and cook fish, vegetables, and poultry with a minimum of fat.
  • Skim fat from homemade soups by chilling and removing the fat layer that rises to the surface.
  • Make favorite cheese-based casseroles with low-fat or reduced-fat cheese. Top with a sprinkling of sharp cheese or grated Romano for more flavor.
  • Buy whole-grain and freshly baked breads and rolls. They have more flavor and do not need butter or margarine to taste good.
  • Choose a vegetarian entree at least once a week.
  • People of all ages can improve the quality of their lives through a lifelong practice of moderate physical activity.
  • Regular physical activity greatly reduces the risk of dying from coronary heart disease, the leading cause of death in the United States.
  • Physical activity enhances mental health, fosters healthy muscles, bones and joints.
  • For people who are unable to set aside 30 minutes for physical activity, shorter episodes are clearly better than none.
  • Regular physical activity prevents or delays the development of high blood pressure, and exercise reduces blood pressure in people with hypertension.
  • Higher levels of regular physical activity are associated with lower mortality rates for both older and younger adults.
  • Regular physical activity is associated with a decreased risk of colon cancer.
  • Regular physical activity lowers the risk of developing non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.
  • Physical activity appears to relieve symptoms of depression and anxiety and improve mood.
  • Did you know that about 25 percent of adults report no physical activity at all in their leisure time? Source: Surgeon General Executive Summary.
  • Did you know that the most popular leisure-time physical activities among adults are walking and gardening or yard work?
  • Poor sleep habits, such as using your bed for reading, TV, telephoning, eating, arguing or worrying can cause insomnia.
  • The keys to quality longevity are prevention and early detection. Include routine physical exams, healthy eating and exercise in your lifetime goals.
  • The biggest problem with high blood pressure is that the person usually has no symptoms.
  • A "healthy" total blood cholesterol level of 200 or lower is desired.
  • De-stress and re-energize with a regular stretch program before and after your workouts.
  • After bathing, dry your feet well with a rough terry-cloth towel. Moisture between the toes is a major cause of athlete's foot.
  • Building a strong back and abdominal muscles will help prevent slipped discs and poor posture.
  • Wash hands often during cold season.
  • Ask family members to cover their mouths and noses when they cough and sneeze, and to wash their hands often.
  • Don't touch your mouth, nose or eyes after handling something a person infected with a cold might have touched.
  • Car Pool Commandment: Take only the number of children for whom you have seat belts.
  • To keep your bones strong, eat plenty of high-calcium foods. Drink skim or low-fat milk and eat non-fat or low-fat yogurt, low-fat cheese, broccoli, kale, and turnip and mustard greens.
  • If you have high blood pressure, eat less salt and sodium. Include herbs and spices for seasoning; use fresh, frozen, or low-sodium canned vegetables; and choose reduced-sodium soups and other canned foods.
  • For problems with constipation, add fiber to your diet - whole-wheat breads, whole-grain cereals and pasta, brown rice, beans, vegetables, and fruits. Also, drink plenty of liquids - 8 glasses of water and other sugar-free and calorie-free beverages daily.
  • No foods are forbidden unless they are unsafe or you are on a diet for medical reasons. Eat smaller portions of the high-fat foods to help control your weight. A high-fat diet can lead to overweight, heart disease, and some types of cancer.
  • Serum cholesterol (in your blood) is influenced by exercise, medication, diet, menopause, and heredity. Dietary cholesterol (in your food) is highest in animal foods, especially liver and egg yolks. Plant foods have no cholesterol.
  • Fat in food influences serum cholesterol more than the cholesterol does. And saturated fat is the type of fat that raises serum cholesterol the most. Saturated fats are: animal fats, tropical oils, and hydrogenated fats.
  • Tips to increase fiber intake: eat more vegetables, fruits, and grains; select whole fruits instead of juice; eat the skin on fruits, such as apples, pears and peaches; choose whole grain breads and cereals, those with 2 grams fiber per serving; eat dried beans; try dried fruit; eat high-fiber cereal; add wheat bran, wheat germ or other sources of fiber to recipes; choose snacks with high-fiber foods; add fiber at the salad bar.
  • Some foods/beverages interfere with iron absorption: coffee, tea and high-fiber foods. Add vitamin C to enhance iron absorption. Foods with highly absorbable iron include meat, fish, and poultry.
  • Many people think that food poisoning is something that you get only when eating away from home. However, most food poisoning occurs from improper storage or preparation of food at home.
  • Eat a variety of nutrient-rich foods. Your body needs 40 - 50 different nutrients daily, and no one food provides all of them. Use the Food Guide Pyramid (found on many food containers) and Nutrition Facts food labels as a guide for your individual daily needs.
  • Sugar-free on the label doesn’t necessarily mean calorie-free. Even if a food contains no sugar, it may contain calories from protein, fat and other carbohydrates. There are many different sugars other than sucrose, commonly known as table sugar.
  • Just because a bread product is brown, this does not mean the product is whole-grain. The color may, in fact, come from caramel coloring. Check the ingredient list to know for sure.
  • One teaspoon contains approximately 2,300 milligrams of sodium. Most of the sodium in the American diet comes from processed and packaged foods - not from using the salt shaker.
  • Just because foods are sold in a health food store doesn’t mean they are nutritionally superior to those sold in traditional stores. Both types of markets sell nutritious foods that can fit into a healthy diet.
  • A moderate intake of alcohol is one drink per day for women and two per day for men. If you enjoy the taste of alcohol but wish to cut back, choose the nonalcoholic beers and wines.
  • Dry- or oil-roasted nuts have about the same number of fat grams and calories. The fat comes from the nut themselves; even if oil-roasted, they don’t absorb much of the oil.
  • All foods fit somewhere inside the Food Guide Pyramid. They are grouped according to the nutrients they provide. No one food group provides all the nutrients needed for a balanced diet.
  • The initials RD after someone’s name means registered dietitian. This is a person who is an authority on the role of food and nutrition in health. He or she can be relied on for nutrition information and advice. To earn this credential, the person must have received degree(s) from a college or university approved by The American Dietetic Association and passed an extensive examination.
  • Pizza can be a nutritious fast food because it contains three of more of the food groups. The actual nutrient content depends upon what you put on top. For a healthier pizza, choose a whole-wheat crust and choose lean toppings: lean ham, Canadian bacon, shrimp, vegetables, and low-fat cheeses.
  • Use small amounts of flavorful oils, such as olive, sesame and chili oil, to season vegetables, meats, sauces, stir-fry and sauteed dishes. Also, season cooked vegetables with herbs, lemon juice or stock.
  • Use ground turkey or extra lean ground beef for casseroles, spaghetti sauce, chili and skillet dishes. Check labels/ingredients to ensure the product(s) really are low fat.
  • For dessert: snack on fresh fruit, angel food cake or sponge cake; use fruit purees to top your cake; substitute low-fat frozen yogurt or sherbet for ice cream. Try frozen juice bars.
  • Weight-bearing physical activity is essential for normal skeletal development during childhood and adolescence and for achieving and maintaining peak bone mass in young adults.
  • There is promising evidence that strength training and other forms of exercise in older adults preserve the ability to maintain independent living status and reduce the risk of falling.
  • Did you know that approximately 15 percent of U.S. adults engage regularly (3 times a week for at least 20 minutes) in vigorous physical activity during leisure time? Source: Surgeon General Executive Summary.
  • You can help prevent injuries by following smart training principles: wear good shoes that fit well, increase exercise intensity by no more than 10 percent a week, stretch and strength train regularly and follow hard training days with easy days or days off.
  • Healthy adults should have their blood cholesterol and triglyceride levels measured at least once every five years, and more frequently, if values are abnormal (consult your doctor).
  • Caffeine-containing foods and beverages, such as coffee, tea, cola and chocolate, can make you feel jumpy, anxious and fearful and can interfere with your ability to relax and sleep.
  • We all have stress in our lives. Some stress is good-it sharpens your mind and motivates you to perform. It's not the stress itself that causes us to feel burnt out, it's how we handle that stress.
  • Disruptive kids can lead to accidents by taking the driver's attention off the road. Find a safe place to pull over and give your child your complete attention, so you can give the road your complete attention later.